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Ortho Menu:
Total
Hip Arthroplasty:

Approach:

Important Safety Information
LOVENOX® (enoxaparin sodium injection) cannot
be used interchangeably with other low-molecular-weight
heparins or unfractionated heparin, as they differ
in their manufacturing process, molecular weight
distribution, anti-Xa and anti-IIa activities,
units, and dosage. When epidural/spinal anesthesia
or spinal puncture is employed, patients anticoagulated
or scheduled to be anticoagulated with low-molecular-weight
heparins or heparinoids are at risk of developing
an epidural or spinal hematoma, which can result
in long-term or permanent paralysis. The risk
of these events is increased by the use of postoperative
indwelling epidural catheters or by the concomitant
use of drugs affecting hemostasis. Patients should
be frequently monitored for signs and symptoms
of neurological impairment. (See boxed WARNING.)
As with other anticoagulants, use with extreme
caution in patients with conditions that increase
the risk of hemorrhage. Dosage adjustment is
recommended in patients with severe renal impairment.
Unless otherwise indicated, agents that may affect
hemostasis should be discontinued prior to LOVENOX
therapy. Bleeding can occur at any site during
LOVENOX therapy. An unexplained fall in hematocrit
or blood pressure should lead to a search for
a bleeding site. (See WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS.)
Thrombocytopenia can occur with LOVENOX®.
In patients with a history of heparin-induced
thrombocytopenia, LOVENOX® should be used
with extreme caution. Thrombocytopenia of any
degree should be monitored closely. If the platelet
count falls below 100,000/mm³, LOVENOX® should
be discontinued. Cases of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia
have been observed in clinical practice. (See
WARNINGS.) The use of LOVENOX® has not been
adequately studied for thromboprophylaxis in
pregnant women with mechanical prosthetic heart
values. (See WARNINGS.) LOVENOX® is contraindicated
in patients with hypersensitivity to enoxaparin
sodium, heparin, or pork products, and in patients
with active major bleeding. Please see full prescribing
information, including boxed WARNING.

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Head Injury Cranio-Maxillary-Facial Injuries Cervical Spine Clavicle Fractures Shoulder Shoulder Spine Humerus Humerus Elbow Joint Elbow Joint Radius Radius Ulna / Ulnar Shaft Ulna / Ulnar Shaft Wrist Wrist Pelvic Pelvic Hand Hand Sacrum and Sacral Pelvic Hip Joint Hip Joint Femoral Shaft Femoral Shaft Knee Joint  Tibia / Tibia Frx Ankle Joint Orthopaedic Foot Orthopaedic Foot

Review
Article: Medical Progress: Total Hip And Total Knee
Replacement
(First of Two Parts).

1990 Proceedings
of The Hip Society-Symposium: Dislocation After
Total
Hip Arthroplasty: Causes and Prevention.

Current
Concepts Review. The Clinical Results and Basic Science
of
Total Hip Arthroplasty with Porous-Coated
Prostheses.

The
first 32 years of total hip arthroplasty. One surgeon's
perspective.

Operative correction
of an unstable total hip arthroplasty.

Current
Concepts Review. Antibiotic-Impregnated Cement in Total
Joint
Arthroplasty.

The trochanteric
approach to the hip for prosthetic replacement.

Total
hip arthroplasty in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

A
comparison of the perioperative morbidity in total joint
arthroplasty
in the obese and nonobese patient.

The
outcome of Charnley total hip arthroplasty with cement
after a minimum
twenty-year follow-up.
The results of one surgeon.

Total hip replacement,
lower limb blood flow and venous thrombogenesis.

Long-term
results of Charnley low-friction arthroplasty in young
patients.

The validity and
reliability of a Total Hip Arthroplasty Outcome Evaluation
Questionnaire.

Hip
arthroplasty in hemophilic arthropathy.

Minor
anatomic abnormalities of the hip joint persisting from
childhood and their
possible relationship
to idiopathic osteoarthrosis. Metal release
in pateints who have had a primary total
hip arthroplasaty. A prospective controlled
longitudinal study. JJ Jacobs. MD et al.


Charnely:

Charnely-Muller:

Girdlestone:

 

Head Injury Cranio-Maxillary-Facial Injuries Cervical Spine Clavicle Fractures Shoulder Shoulder Spine Humerus Humerus Elbow Joint Elbow Joint Radius Radius Ulna / Ulnar Shaft Ulna / Ulnar Shaft Wrist Wrist Pelvic Pelvic Hand Hand Sacrum and Sacral Pelvic Hip Joint Hip Joint Femoral Shaft Femoral Shaft Knee Joint  Tibia / Tibia Frx Ankle Joint Orthopaedic Foot Orthopaedic Foot Head Injury Cranio-Maxillary-Facial Injuries Cervical Spine Clavicle Fractures Shoulder Shoulder Spine Humerus Humerus Elbow Joint Elbow Joint Radius Radius Ulna / Ulnar Shaft Ulna / Ulnar Shaft Wrist Wrist Pelvic Pelvic Hand Hand Sacrum and Sacral Pelvic Hip Joint Hip Joint Femoral Shaft Femoral Shaft Knee Joint  Tibia / Tibia Frx Ankle Joint Orthopaedic Foot Orthopaedic Foot
©1996,
C.R. Wheeless MD / Duke University Medical Center


Original Text by Clifford R. Wheeless, III, MD.